My Drive-pered Escapade

This is going to be a long post. The diaper portions are little, but trust me, they are ‘juicy’, mind the pun. Think of this post as a story. You can read the diapered chapters only, if you so wish.

Chapter 1: Pick-up day

I’ve not had an escapade in quite a while as now I have better access to diapers since ORD. But I still longed for that freedom of being able to go wherever I want, being a tourist in my own country etc. Also, I’ve always wanted to rent a car and ‘just drive’, for the fun of it. And that’s just what I did. I even came up with 4 ‘modules’, just for the fun of planning it.

I rented a small car for my Escapade, a simple Suzuki Swift. And the pick-up itself was quite a mess! Their office was in an industrial complex, and the address that I received was unclear. Once I found the place, I was told that I had to pay the deposit in cash. So, I fumbled back down to the vast complex and had to find an ATM. It took me nearly half an hour!. But my ordeal didn’t end there. The guy led me to the car, and instructed me to get into the passenger seat. I assumed that he was going to show me the interior. But instead, he zoomed off to the neighbouring industrial complex! It was evening and he didn’t even tell me where we was going until I asked. Turned out that he simply wanted a ‘lift’ to the place since I had rented out their last car.

So there I was, in the middle of another, unfamiliar industrial complex. Gingerly, I drove out, and took a wrong turn… Had to stop to consult Google Maps. I had decided to go to Kovan for dinner, and to experience night driving at the same time, and I did. As I was approaching the carpark, it dawned onto me that I had forgotten to put in the Cashcard. Upon closer inspection, I realised that it was the ‘older’ Cashcard, not CEPAS. Luckily, the gantry opened. Heaving a sigh of relief, I went in and found a spot. Being a perfectionist, I re-aligned the Swift 3 times before getting out. And a homeless man watching that scene laughed. Walking away, I got myself a Subway sandwich, and a Cashcard. Drove home and parked in a multi-storey car park a little further from my house (for obvious reasons). The very MSCP that my dad proclaimed that was ‘very difficult to negotiate’.

Chapter 2: I need a toilet

The next day, I had planned to put on my diaper at home before commencing my driving. Then, my grandma decided to go walking that morning, and I knew that I couldn’t take any chance. I walked down, underwear on, diaper in my bag, greeted her, and walked on. At first, I wanted to put it on in the public toilet at the Community Centre. But they had just commenced cleaning. The nearby MRT Station was similarly undergoing cleaning. And as the clock had struck 9am, I decided to just move on.

I drove out of the MSCP WITH GREAT EASE (emphasis added), and drove on to East Coast Park’s Seafood Centre. I had chosen that carpark as it would be deserted in the morning, and it was. I quickly donned on my Softess diaper (horrible HORRIBLE design, but good absorbency), bagged my underwear (I’ll come back for this), and bought a lemonade before commencing some self-teaching, ‘skills module’. I taught myself to do forward-parking, and to reverse to the rear without looking at the mirrors. These things were not taught in driving-school, and I guess I’ll never use the latter, it is so silly.

After I was satisfied that I had mastered it somewhat, I decided to commence my ‘city-driving module’. But I realised that I should have awoken earlier, as most of the traffic jams had cleared by 11.30. I out of the carpark, kept to the service road and drove up Still Road, and down Changi Road, all the way to Bukit Merah before turning into Telok Blangah. Modest distance. I peed a trickle at some traffic stops, but nothing major.

I then stopped at a carpark, for another glass of lemonade. It turned out that I was in LKY’s ward, which meant that the place that I was sitting in was frequented by my grandmother, before I was born. A place which I had stumbled across by accident, an oral legend, since my grandmother moved out of the area before I was born. And I see if for the first time while I was wearing a diaper. Like it was meant to be… I wonder if the old ladies I saw still remembered my grandmother.

Sentiments aside, I commenced my ‘hilly-region module’. The route was simple; drive up and down Mount Faber’s steep and winding roads, loop and repeat. The valets at the Jewel@Mount Faber must have been wondering what in the world was I doing. Anyway, though some sections were indeed steep and winding, it was really nothing. I guess real mountain roads would be much more challenging. So, no driving up to Cameron Highlands for now. With that thought, I paused for lunch at the Harbourfront Food Centre.

Chapter 3: Don’t laugh at me!

After that, I decided to head down to the Australian Embassy. It took me a while to figure things out, but I drove to the Hong Lim Park Complex to park at the MSCP there. There, I would change out of my diaper, and walk downtown to do my thing. I set off. It was a simpler MSCP, so I parked easily. There I made a horrible discovery. I HAD LEFT MY UNDERWEAR AT EAST COAST! My heart was racing. I was wearing a diaper that seemed very heavy, and I didn’t know what was its capacity. My lunch-time deluge was on its way, and I had to face the prospect of walking 3 streets wearing a wet diaper, directly into the Australian Embassy. I was left with no choice. I started my walk. Along the way, tourists stopped me to ask for directions, I ran for the traffic light as my diaper crinkled audibly. And when I made it to the Embassy, I found out that I had ‘just’ missed the cut-off time for the day’s applications.

Sadly, I started my walk back. And as I was waiting at a traffic light, I heard laughing. I turned around and saw a group of three white men, with a deep accent (probably from the UK or Australia). Then one of them said ‘look at his pants’. And the three burst out laughing. That was when I realised just how visible the outline of my full diaper was. It was a real nightmare – I was standing in the middle of the CBD in broad daylight wearing a wet diaper with a visible outline, and people were laughing at me! I just changed direction and walked away from the junction as fast as I could go. I won’t comment on the likelihood of them being ABDL.

Chapter 4: Underwear Woes

I made it back to the car, and had a little scare when I could the car parked in a different deck. Almost died from the fear. I made up my mind to alter my route and go back to East Coast. I wasn’t sure if the plastic-bag was still there. But I had to try. 25 nerve-wracking minutes later, I had arrived. And from a distance, I noticed that people were sitting the seat I last remembered sitting. The whole place was still empty and they had to sit at that seat. My mind was a blank. I knew that it was game over but my legs just kept walking towards the table. And at a distance where they started to notice me, I saw it.

The white plastic bag was there, chucked aside into the nearby plants. As quick as I could, I grabbed the bag and walked away as quick as I could. But the moment I lay my hands on the bag, the group burst out laughing. I knew immediately that they were the ones who had moved the bag. But whatever, I never felt so glad that I was going to wear underwear! And so, I moved toward the very toilet cubicle where I had put on the diaper, and proceeded to pee out what little liquid was left within me that I hadn’t let out during the 25 min drive. I suppressed the urge to go #2, and changed out of my well-used diaper. With a tinge of longing, I threw the gleaming garment away, wrapped in the white plastic bag that had been holding a used underwear just minutes ago.

Chapter 5: No more diaper

With that, the ‘diapered’ part of my ‘Drive-pered Escapade’ had just ended. But up ahead lay my the part that I was looking forward to the most – the ‘long -distance module’. I had to alter my route due to the detour, and due to various delays it was going to be highly truncated. But I was determined to make to best of it. So I set off, covering half the ECP, before turning into the KPE, driving up all the way on to TPE, then the PIE till the end, east on AYE, up the CTE and back east on the PIE towards the industrial complex. I nearly missed a u-turn, but was able to make it back in time to return the vehicle.

At times, I caught myself wanting to pee. I sort of missed the way the diaper provided extra padding for me on the seat. I missed the extra comfort that was now gone. And, of course, the option of ‘going on the go’. But I realised that while the diaper had shaped my day, it was the driving I really benefitted from, yet was playing down..

Epilogue

I thank you for reading about my experience. I guess the one thing that I learnt would be that when you plan, always expect the plan to change. With that, I wish to announce that I will be going away on a holiday for 10 days. I’ll be backpacking to Australia, and if all goes well, I’ll be wearing a diaper for the very first time in a foreign country. No promises, but I’ll try to blog in that period.

Until then, take care.

-Selv

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Farewell LKY

Today, Singapore bid it’s final farewell to its’ first Prime Minister, Mr Lee Kuan Yew. Love him or hate him, we all can’t help but respect him and what he has done for our country. After battling with pneumonia for more than a month, Mr Lee passed on early in the morning hours of 23rd March.

Mr Lee was a typical Southeast-Asian leader. He did what he had to do, and he did it well. Yet he did controversial things too. However I’ve come to realise that, while anyone of that day could have achieved what he had done, HE was the one who did it. And that is why I respect him.

He is not just revered by Singaporeans alone, there were several foreign dignitaries who attended the State Funeral today. Former US president Bill Clinton, Henry Kissinger, the Indian, Japanese, Australian Prime Ministers, Governor-generals and the Chinese Vice-president were present, among others. Condolences and accolades poured in from all corners of the word. A day of national mourning was also announced in India and New-Zealand as well. This is a testament of how respected he is.

I shan’t go into the details, for I leave it to history to decide the extent of his achievements and mistakes. But I respect the man. There is a chinese saying, which translated says: The first generation builds up wealth, the second generation maintains it, and the third squanders it. I really feel sorry that you had to see this, Mr Lee.

I too stood in line in the wet rain, watching as your procession went past. I saw the many Singaporeans who were kind, handing out ponchos and closing their umbrellas to let those behind see, giving space for the young children to see. I didn’t see anything ugly. I only saw love, love that has been stifled by online dissent, love that hasn’t surfaced in a long time.

Love you or hate you, we all can’t help but respect you.

Rest in peace, Sir.