Tena Slip Super vs. Super Seni Diapers Comparison

Hi guys, this is the first post in a series where I compare different diapers as a form of review. These chosen diapers will be similar to each other in terms of price and absorbency. So let’s get started!

Background

The Super Seni diaper was first introduced by Toruńskie Zakłady Materiałów Opatrunkowych (TMZO) group in 2005. It was a pioneer in cloth-backed diapers and is a staple in Europe. The Seni brand consists of 4 absorbency levels – Seni, Seni Plus, Seni Trio and Seni Quadro. They comes in five sizes. We will be looking at the Super Seni (Seni), which has an absorbency colour code blue.

Tena is an industry giant in the Adult Diaper industry and makes several different types of diapers. Produced by the SCA Group, we will be looking at the Tape-on Tena Slip line. This line gave the ABDL world the famous plastic-backed Tena Slip Maxi. However to keep in line with EU regulations, in 2012 they remodelled the line into a cloth-backed diaper. It too comes with 4 absorbency levels – Plus, Super, Maxi and Ultima, and come in three sizes S,M,L (except for the Plus which has an extra XS size). We will be looking at the Tena Slip Super (TSS), which has an absorbency colour code of Green.

Size, Fit and Price

The Super Seni diaper retails at Fairprice Xtra in sizes M and L. The Tena Slip Super however is available a little more widely in Fairprice Xtra, Giant and virtually all pharmacies, hospitals and policlinics. Although, you’d likely find the S sizes in the latter.

M size Seni: 75-110cm (30-43 in)

M Size Slip Super: 72-122cm (28-48 in)

As you can see, Seni has a smaller waist allowance, starting at nearly the same point of 75cm. But its maximum waist allowance stops a full 12cm shorter than for the Slip Super. I find this paradoxical. The Seni diaper is evidently designed for the bigger-sized European but it has a shorter waist range. Tena is also supposedly designed for the European market but when I first tried it, it was tight, as if almost designed for the smaller-sized asian market.

I am a smaller-sized person and I felt that when I wore the Seni – it hung off my hips and when the diaper was almost fully wet it just dangled from my hips. The TSS fit me snugly though. This situation is reversed for a slightly larger-sized person. My friend says the Seni fits him perfectly but the Tena Slip was too tight. So this one is a little subjective.

Price-wise I haven’t really been paying attention to the Seni over the years but for the past year or so I noticed that they hover at the $11.40 range for 10 dips, before discounts. That works out to be $1.14 per dip. The TSS however has stayed constant at about $14.15 for 10 dips, before discount. That works out to be $1.42 per dip. However due to the availability of the TSS you can get it as low as $50 for a case of 60 sometimes on Carousell, regularly. 

Appearance and Features

Both diapers have most of the features associated with a good diaper. They have elastic leg gathers, standing leak guards, wetness indicators, additional wetness distribution systems and elastic waistbands. Although Seni has both front and back, the TSS only has back waistbands. Seni’s waistband is thicker and longer, expanding to 21 from 15cm while the TSS expands to 16 from 11cm. The TSS’s waistband tends to tear up internally though, rendering the top non-elastic after a while.

I think off the bat you can tell which diaper is the thicker diaper. The TSS comes in at nearly 3cm after inflating for a day while the Seni stays at 2.5cm after a day. When folded the Seni is the longer diaper at 24x16cm vs 23.5x 17 for the TSS. Top to bottom the Seni measures 83cm, 71cm padded while the TSS comes in at 78cm, 57 padded.

Seni has a thicker crotch at 16 out of 29cm vs 15 out of 27cm for the TSS.

This shows that the Seni diaper is thinner than the TSS, yet is longer despite having the same amount of crotch padding. No wonder the Seni diaper feels big!

The tapes are crucial parts of any diaper. Both use four-tape systems that latch on directly onto the cloth backing Both have velcro-type hooks on the front and a sticky part at the back of the tape. I will say that Seni’s tapes are very strong, they barely budge at all. But, on the second use the stickiness is gone and it is just the velcro holding onto the backing, making it very vulnerable at full capacity. The Tena Slip’s tapes tend to stretch the cloth backing off (an inherent problem of the backing, not the tape), but they work just fine for up to 3 fastenings as the stickiness remains a little. 

The wetness indicators of both diapers consist of lines running from the top to the bottom. Although being a white diaper it is usually quite obvious when it is wet as the white turns darkish. On the Tena Slip the two sets of thin blue lines disappear, while on the Seni they turn from yellow to blue.

The markings on each diaper is a little different. For the Seni, the wetness indicators are flanked by 2 rows of a nonvanishing number, 2 in my case. Seni uses numbers to indicate size with 1 being S, 2 being M etc. Tena Slip has a 4 boxes appearing 3 times along the centre showing the brand name, the diaper type (slip), the size and the absorbency level (6/8 drops). The size, (M in my case) also flank the wetness indicators in 2 asymmetrical rows. 

Absorbency

The TSS has an advertised absorbency of 1800ml, or 6 droplets out of 8. While the Seni does not have an advertised absorbency, it has a similar rating of 6 out of 9 droplets. 

Both diapers have a topsheet, which comes into contact with the skin, a padding core, a waterproof backing, and a cloth-like topsheet. The sides of both diapers are made of breathable material. Both have a secondary internal core. Seni has one which tends to dislodge near capacity, and detaches completely when full. It does not have a fancy name unlike the Tena Slip. The area directly above it’s core is called the Feel Dry Layer.

I feel that overall, the TSS has a better liquid retention, but the Seni has a better overall absorbency. I say this because Seni is able to contain a larger volume of wettings, but when you exceed the capacity, a fair bit more seeps out through. For the TSS, only the excess comes out through the back and not the sides.

Final thoughts

The Super Seni was meant to be on par with the Tena Slip Plus, but it slightly edges out the Tena Slip Super. Yes, it does have leaking issues, but it has a higher absorption capacity before the leaks begin. The cloth-backing also does not expand unlike for the TSS, and it has the marks of a (poorly designed) medical diaper.

You cannot deny that the TSS can be cheaper on a per-diaper basis. It is also much more readily available, in Singapore and Malaysia, that the Seni range. On the appearance front the TSS still looks medical but at least it has cheerful colours. 

As for the fit, this is a subjective one but I would say that I prefer the Tena Slip due to it having a tighter waist allowance. I also feel that the ability to refasten your diaper multiple times is a plus, although this is slight comfort since most of the time we use the diaper just once.

Perhaps, I may be slightly biased towards the TSS because it is my go-to diaper, but I definitely favour the TSS.

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Diapers Have Come In!

I was surfing online for some lego sets. I know they cost a lot of money so I was sort of content window shopping, or whatever the equivalent term is for online shopping. I mean, just look at the Harry Potter set they just released, if it was half the price I would have bought it, it is so good!

Anyway, I digressed, and searched for some vinatge diapers. Guess what! They were selling some old plastic-backed Tena Slip Supers at a huge discount! So I bought them. And one thing led to another and I had bought several other types as well as well.

To complete the group I went over to ABDL Marketplace and bought some Rearz and Crinklz samples as well. And then I waited, for the entire lot to be mailed over.

I used a postal forwarder to consolidate all the packages and mail it to me in Singapore. I opted to pick it up from one of their self-collect points to avoid delivery to my home or hostel. So late at night, when the coast was empty I made my way to the collection point.

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I must admit that I underestimated the space 45 diapers took up. They came in several packages and I couldn’t fit all of them in my bag. which meant that I had to hand carry the 3 largest ones back to my hostel on the shuttle bus. I wasn’t too worried. But I did wonder what they might have thought if they knew what was inside.

Anyway I was excited. I made my way back to my hall, showered and put on my nightly cloth-backed Tena Slip Super, and began to open my packages as if Christmas came early.

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– Selv

New Review Up

Hi guys,

I was surfing the internet last weekend when I came across this amazing video of an ‘anti translation’. The author has tried to translate the famous french song Non Je Ne Regrette Rien, but as you can expect, the outcome is hilarious! You can watch this here:

Been rushing with my quizzes this past week, more coming next week but can’t really stop now!

In case you guys have missed it, here’s my Super Seni Diaper Review

And my most recent Tumblr short story – Safe Jungle Water