Missing Plastic-backed Diapers

As time moves on, we don’t really think much about the old plastic-backed diapers these days. I mean, in this part of the world where many of us hide our diapers from family and where the weather is hot, cloth-backed diapers and pull-ups are the obvious choice. Even though a plastic-backed diaper is much cheaper, we prioritise comfort and security.

A few months back I had managed to get my hands on some vintage diapers. They are some Tena Slips which I had managed to bring into Singapore with some difficulty, but that’s a story for another day… Anyway, I haven’t really worn them since.

For those of you who follow my Tumblr post you may remember a few days ago I did open up a vintage Tena Slip Plus and double-up over my usual cloth-backed Slip Plus. I did that because I was already in my cloth-backed diaper and I didn’t really want to damage the tapes.

Anyway, it did bring back come memories for me. The texture of the plastic-backing and the occasional crinkle as I shifted in my seat were but a reminder that I am a longtime ABDL. I guess the younger ABDLS and TBDLs won’t really know what’s fantastic about these Tenas but for me it was a wonderful feeling.

But I did forget that these plastic-backed diapers don’t stretch. I placed the tapes onto the frontal patch at the same location I did before I gained some weight (mind you, it’s just a few kilos). And a few minutes later I was contemplating adjusting the tapes because they were tight, and didn’t stretch like a cloth-backed diaper would.

I gave up eventually and took off the vintage Tena, knowing that if i had readjusted it the tapes would lose stickiness when the time came for me to eventually use it. Bottom felt much less constricted.

To be honest, I’m not sure why I’m still not using my plastic-backed dips. I must have bought at least 7 packs of my usual cloth-backed Tenas since I received them, but I haven’t touched any of the vintage diapers and a handful of other ABDL dips I bought all those months ago (save for that VTSP which I keep wearing over other dips).

I mean I do wan’t to wear them, but with my current situation it’s possible-but-risky and I just have a handful of them. I could get some Tena Values or some Fairprice dips, but again, security. Crinkles are fun, until your dad hears them. Yeah I know, I’ve been down that rabbit hole before. There is no such risk with cloth-backed diapers. And when dry they don’t poof out too.

I guess that these vintage diapers are “too precious” for me to use them on an ordinary night. I haven’t been on any diapered escapades recently so maybe for my upcoming Bali trip I might try a couple at long last. I did want to “model out” and take some pics, but I realised that 1) my body isn’t exactly photogenic, 2) I’m not a girl and 3) with Tumblr clamping down I have nowhere to post them. Oh well ¯\_(ツ)_/¯ 

– Selv

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Cloth-diapers

Like many parts of the world, cloth diapers are gaining traction in Singapore too. There was a recent newspaper article which highlighted this trend.

There are two schools of thought which draw people towards cloth-diapering. The first would be the environmental degradation that disposable diapers cause. A child would use up to 5400 diapers in 3 years, which ends up in landfills or, in Singapore’s case, additional trash which needs to be incinerated. The other thought is the cost. A starter of cloth-diapers would cost about $400-$500, but disposable diapers would cost upwards of $2000 and more.

Yet, the take-up rate is slow. A parent even put her name on record that she prefers disposables, that is how mainstream disposable diaper usage is in Singapore. None of my relatives cloth-diaper their kids in the ‘modern cloth diaper’ sense, but they still do cloth diaper then with muslin cloth for the first year or so. The reasoning is that newborns go through several napkin changes a day, and their skins are delicate.

Furthermore, my grandma and aunt claim that baby poo isn’t really that bad smelling cos they don’t have the germs that adult ones have, hence its ‘easier to handle’. Plus, they use a sheet of Napkin Liner, essentially a tough tissue paper, that took most of the solid away for easy washing. This is something the article did not mention when they talked about Muslin cloth diapers.

But the rate of napkin usage has been dropping too. The advent of cloth-backed diapers, replacing plastic-backed ones in the process, ensures that skin-breathability has massively improved.

Which brings us back to why people still use disposables. The first reason is the convenience of wipe-and-throw, and the second is the perceived notion that disposable diapers will never leak. A third reason, as cited in the article, is that many daycare centres do not allow for cloth-backed diapers in their centers.

All three of these reasons have to do with the mindset of ease and convenience. “The environmentalist doesn’t have to deal with baby excretions,” my aunt declared as we debated, which kind of shut me up.

– Selv

Pull-ups

I decided to give pull-up style diapers a second chance.

I was at a store late one evening and my choices were partly down to the 12 piece, $10.45 Tena Value diapers and the 10 piece, $13.90 Guardian Adult Pants diapers. I was running out of time, I needed to be home soon. I was also worried about the noise that the Tena Values made. So I reckoned that the cloth-backed pull-ups would be something different.

The only time I had an experience with pull-ups was when I bought a pack of Goodnites. Even back then, they felt tight on me and didn’t cover much area, meaning that I had to re-position my asset every time I needed to pee. But at least they held a substantial volume. So, in the few minutes that I had, I decided to see how a store-brand, adult-sized pull-up would fare on me.

The packaging looked promising. But it was when I held out a diaper that all my expectations evaporated. Within a minute of putting it on, I began to regret my earlier decision.

The fitting was not snug and tight, the padded area was not big enough to cover my male assets and as I would discover the next morning, even under controlled conditions, liquid escaped through the top and sides as the elastic gathers were not water resistant.

The one thing good about these particular pull-ups is that they hold about 2 medium wettings. But what’s the point if it can’t direct the liquid into the padded area?

The main aims of a diaper would be to catch any emissions in order to protect the wearer’s clothes and thus dignity, and to keep the wearer comfortable to a large extent by being a good fit and not being noisy etc. I feel that these pull-ups fail in the first aim, at least for male wearers.

I regret giving pull-up style diapers a second chance.

– Selv

Diaper Shopping In Diapers

Earlier I had returned to my uni hostel after the long weekend. My roommate wasn’t back  from Malaysia yet and I decided to go out of campus again to replenish my diaper stash and eat dinner. I really did not feel like removing my diaper, so I pulled my jeans over it and left for Jurong Point Mall.

As today was a public holiday, most of the shops and food-court stalls weren’t open, but the mall was crowded for some unknown reason. I settled for some fast food at KFC, and set about looking for the Unity pharmacy. I wanted to avoid Fairprice Supermarkets (there were 2 in this mall, for some unknown reason) in case I bumped into people I knew. It was getting late anyway.

I found it inside one of the Fairprice, it was a tiny outlet. Their diaper shelf had a limited selection of Lifree, Tena Value and Tena Slip Super. I settled for the TSS. There were only two packages of mediums left, on the topmost shelf. I cringed as I reached up, my shirt riding up dangerously. One of them was dusty as if it had been on the top shelf for a long time, so I had to reach up again for the other. The price was also cheap, at $1.40. I didn’t think much of it.

I quickly paid for my purchase and left the outlet, walking past the foreign workers who were starting to flood the mall. I stopped to quickly stuff the package into my backpack, and was soon off.

But as I walked to catch the bus back, something seemed strange. The package was light and smaller, the price was significantly cheaper without discounts, and one package was dusty. Then it dawned on me that I may have chanced upon the original plastic-backed Tena Slips! Unfortunately, the bus was crowded with students and I had to wait and see.

Eagerly I returned to my room and opened up my backpack. It was just the regular cloth-backed Tena Slip Super, sadly. But it did give me a good story for my Tuesday post 🙂

I’ve written a second review, this time for the Tena Wet Wipes. Do read it if you would like to know more about these fantastic wipes.

– Selv

To ship or not to ship

I really really want to get my hands on some Bambinos and the plastic-backed Tena Slips. And I know that bambinodiapers.com is one of the best places to get them. They do free shipping within the continental US, but not for overseas deliveries.

There is a way to circumvent it, and that is to use vPost or Comgateway to ship them over. And here is where the catch is: it is expensive. And I don’t have discount codes. I got the dimensions from Bambino and did some calculations. And if I were to ship using vPost, this would be the total cost of the diapers and the postal forwarding:

  • Bambino Bellissimo   – Tot: $105.88 ($6.62/pc)
  • Tena Slip Maxi               – Tot: $114.66 ($4.78/pc)
  • Molicare Super Plus   – Tot: $155.34 ($5.55/pc)

The most expensive diaper in Singapore that I’ve come across would be the Abena M4 at $1.93/pc. The Tena Slip Maxi (cloth-backed) comes close at $1.75/pc. So that’s 5 cloth backed TSMs to 2 plastic-backed ones.

My finances are tight. Student-level tight. Guess that if I really want to try these diapers, I’d have to visit the US first.

– Selv

I miss you..

I miss my Tena Slip Supers! The Tena Values feel like some plastic-bag tied around my bottom, they are more airier and noisy. But I’m stuck with them till December, at my current rate.. I still have two TSS diapers left, will keep them for a good occasion. I guess it is the fit, they are really comfy, being cloth-backed.

Anyway, here’s a picture from my recent diapered escapede to KL. I made a massive mess (you can’t really tell), but the diaper held it well.

Dr P Rev -14

School is picking up pace real quick. Gotta run!

– Selv

The Cloth vs. Plastic Debate

I believe that all of us have engaged in this debate in one form or another. And we have good reasons for doing so, for it is going to affect our way of life. For better or worse, you might ask. Let us explore this topic a little then.

We have been hearing stories of just how many manufacturers have been switching from plastic-backed to cloth-backed products. Abena, Tena, Molicare, you name it. But why is this mass migration taking place? It all boils down somewhat to an obscure 2009 EU Ecolabel regulation on sanitary products. In a nutshell, it intends to regulate the environmental impact of all sanitary products, of which incontinence products, including diapers, are included. The only tangible benefit is that environmentally-conscious consumers will be drawn to products carrying this EU Ecolabel logo.

But the real driving force comes from the vast consumer base of the diaper manufacturers themselves. You see, any good business will do their research studiously. They will reach out to their customers and end-users, and the good businesses will take steps to address their needs and concerns. If not, they simply will lose their customers. It is important to note at this juncture that the bulk of the target group would be people like the elderly, terminally ill, and the incontinent. The other two groups – ABDLs and longshiftworkers – form a small proportion of these businesses.

Plastic-bcked diapers have been the norm for many years. We know them as the reliable one-piece backing garment that is very good with water-retention. You’d adjust the tapes at most once, and they retain their stickiness for a very long period. People are also very attached to plastic-backed as most ABDLs wore plastic-backed disposables themselves when they were kids. Yet, we all can’t ignore the two biggest drawbacks of plastic – their crinkles are very noisy, which reduces discreteness. They also have a notorious reputation for trapping heat, which can be very uncomfortable if you live in a tropical country like Singapore.

Cloth-backed diapers are new and emerging. First the baby diapers started the switch, but it took several years, and some EU policy *coughs unceremoniously* before adult diapers followed suit. Breathable? Not everyone agrees on this one, see below. Low-adhesive tapes? Everyone agrees on this, though Tena has some good tapes. But when it comes to discreetness, I think cloth wins hands down. Admittedly, the biggest drawback for me is that price wise, they have some catching up to do. (I can get 24 Tena Values for the price of 12 Tena Slips).

But I guess that the biggest misconception that the diapered-public has about cloth-backed diapers is this. They have a plastic-backing too. Only, it is directly under the padding area only and it is very thin.

 Diaper Meme

Yes folks, the truth is out. This explains so much about cloth’s shortcomings! Liquid in over-soaked diapers simply escapes out of the sides. The sides are the portion that is breathable. So, in researching for this post, I’ve come to realise that when I buy a cloth-backed diaper, I am actually buying a plastic-backed diaper with a cloth cover. No wonder these are so pricey.

And that is the ‘dirty’ truth about cloth-backed. The fact is, the majority of tape-on diaper users want cloth-backed. And given that the big players European players i.e Abena and Tena are already switching to cloth, it is only a matter of time before the smaller players and their American counterparts bite the bullet.

Fortunately, there is a ray of hope. Two rays, to be exact. The first is the fact that these big companies haven’t completely shut down their plastic-backed lines. Remember, there are the incontinents who prefer plastic too. The older plastic Abena and the Tena Value (Tena Slip Original in Europe) are a testament to this. Then there are also the ABDL-centric diaper manufacturers. Bambino, Fabines, ABU(though it seems everyone is boycotting them). There are the newer manufacturers, such as AwwSoCute and Diaper Connoisseur. So, plastic will live on.

But I realise that many people are not giving cloth a second chance. They try a pack or two, and they conclude that it is not their type. I respect their conclusion. It is just that I feel many of these people aren’t giving enough time and effort into making it work for them. It is just like getting a new phone. If you’ve been on iPhones (3GS, 4S, 5S) for many years and you try out a Samsung Galaxy Note 4, you just can’t get the hang of it in a week. It would take several weeks before you get around its visible flaws and discover the hidden benefits.

For me, discreetness is top priority, and as I spend most of my time diapered asleep, wetness is not an issue. So cloth-backed is my preferred backing. Sadly, these are just too expensive, and I only get them as a special treat.

What I really wish is for the greater ABDL community to give cloth a greater chance, and more time before writing them off. The vast majority simply swear by plastic, and I wish that they would try out various cloth-backed brands before coming to their conclusion. I am sure that they have tried several plastic-backed brands before choosing their ‘favourite diaper’.

– Selv